Completion? Last Furnished? Stop Date?

Many ways to reference what most consider to be the same thing. However, everyone of these terms have completely different meanings and various concerns on those planning to secure their outstanding receivables on any given job.

Lets take some time to give each of these the respect they deserve and hopefully avoid compromising your lien rights due to misunderstanding.

First and foremost is the COMPLETION date. This is usually manifested by a formal filing of a “Notice of Completion” with the recorders office in the county where the property is located. But it may also be confirmed by the owner and the general contractor agreeing that the contract is completed, final payment is made, and no further work is required. In other words the COMPLETION is driven by the finalization of the original construction contract between the owner or owner’s agent and the general contractor.

So why is this important?

Why is it any different than the date you last furnished to the project or the date your company stopped working on the job?

One thing to consider is the lien law statute for the state where the property is located. If the statute declares that the time for anyone holding a right to bring a mechanics lien against the job will expire 90 days after the Notice of Completion is recorded. Then on the 91st day after recordation, your lien rights are gone.

Now there are states which declare that a subcontractor or materials supplier is allowed up to 90 days after last furnishing to record and serve a mechanics lien.

How does this differ from the above?

When you consider any project which may last many months or perhaps years. Many different trades could participate in the project long before the original construction contract between the owner and the general contractor is completed. However, if the state statute requires them to record and serve their mechanics lien, not later than 90 days after their STOP DATE or after they last supplied to the project. Then their mechanics lien rights will also disappear 91 days after they finish.

So how do you protect your open accounts receivables when there are so many variables which could impact your time to take action?

At CRM we offer a clients a service called “eAlerts Unlimited” This Lien Rights Tracking Program is driven by the STOP DATE, or anticipated STOP DATE, which is recorded on the date your request for a notice to establish your lien rights is received. Most clients do not know when they will stop supplying to the job. For some it may be a one time shipment, while others may continue to supply for months or perhaps for the duration of the project. One key point to keep in mind is: “It is not¬†solely based on the shipments you may supply to the job site” It is also governed by each of your customers who may have ordered from you for the same project. Each customer will need to be named in separate initial notices that will protect your lien rights on this project.

The sweet feature of the CRM Unlimited eAlerts program is that it E X T E N D S your time to take action by the continuation of your “Last Shipped Orders”. The CRM eAlert Reports (Weekly, Monthly, or As Requested) will allow you the opportunity to compare the

“STOP DATE” on the report with your last SHIP DATE in your accounts receivables file.

When they are the same, you will need to consider the recommended action as listed in the report. When these dates differ, you may note your last ship date on the report and return, via email, to CRM. We will then extend your original STOP DATE to the new LAST SHIP date and your time to consider a mechanics lien will be extended accordingly.

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